Keynote to be delivered by Anthony Tether, Director, Defense Advanced Research Project Agency

By M. Abraham

Marking another milestone year of growth, the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science will hold its 2007 Technology Forum on Thursday, May 3.

The annual review will showcase the school’s groundbreaking research in a number of emerging disciplines, including bioengineering, embedded systems and nanotechnology and will explore the impact these fields will have on the future.
Running from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., the review will be held at De Neve Commons on the UCLA campus. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. For a full agenda and further details, visit www.engineer.ucla.edu/techforum.

This year’s forum will feature a keynote address by Anthony Tether, director of the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, as well as talks by distinguished speakers Henry Samueli, co-founder of Broadcom, and Andrew Viterbi, co-founder and former chief technology officer of Qualcomm.

Faculty, postdoctoral researchers and graduate students will present research from across the institution, and initiatives underway in a number of the school’s major research centers also will be highlighted. In addition, speakers from leading California companies will discuss future research in these areas from an industrial perspective.

The 2007 Technology Forum will include morning sessions featuring presentations on nanoelectronics and nanosystems, using sensors to monitor the environment, human simulation using computer animation, and an overview of the challenges of nanoelectronics and nanosystems.

Lunch will include short talks by Siavash Alamouti, chief technology officer for Intel’s Mobile Wireless Group; Rajeev Madhavan, CEO and chair of Magma Design Automation; and David Whelan, vice president for strategic growth, business development and strategy at Boeing Phantom Works.

The afternoon will be split into a series of presentations on timely topics from researchers across the school, including professor Bruce Dunn, who will discuss three-dimensional microbatteries; professor Vasilios Manousiouthakis, who will talk about using hydrogen for transportation; professor Jennifer Jay, who will explore the affect of pollutants — such as mercury and arsenic — on large populations in developing and developed countries; and professor James Dunn, who will look at possible alternatives to waiting for donor transplants.

Journalists are invited to attend any of the sessions at no charge but must R.S.V.P. for attendance and parking.